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Diver

The content listed below has been tagged with the topic "Diver." Explore other topics to discover additional exciting content.

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Dive Unit
Unit Diving Supervisor: Robert P. Stone (Office: 907-789-6031) Locations:  Juneau, AK Sitka, AK St, George Island, AK St. Paul Island, AK Website: http://alaskafisheries.noaa.gov/ Sub-unit: NMFS / Alaska Regional Office /...
Frequently Asked Question

What is marine debris?

Our oceans are filled with items that do not belong there. Huge amounts of consumer plastics, metals, rubber, paper, textiles, derelict fishing gear, vessels, and other lost or discarded items enter the marine environment every day, making marine debris one of the most widespread pollution problems facing the world's oceans and waterways.

Marine debris is defined as any persistent solid material that is manufactured or processed and directly or indirectly, intentionally or unintentionally, disposed of or abandoned into the marine environment or the Great Lakes. Learn more about marine debris and find out how to prevent it.

NOAA divers from the Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center diving unit have been working since 1996 to remove marine debris, specifically derelict fishing gear, from the Hawaiian Archipelago. Every year they set out on the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai to survey vast swaths of coast line and coral habitat to collect tons of the derelict fishing gear. Read more about why this is important and what they have collected so far on the NOAA Fisheries website.

NOAA Divers wearing dry suits after a working dive in Alaska
Basic page
The Unit Diving Supervisor has a crucial role within the NOAA Diving Program. Unit Diving Supervisors (UDSs) must make decisions about all diving related activities at their unit: when dives occur, how the dives are executed...
RADM Score and Diving Safety Board members
Basic page
The NOAA Diving Control and Safety Board (NDCSB), the governing body of the NOAA Diving Program, is the ultimate authority in drafting and approving all diving policies and guidelines.  NOAA Diving Regulations are currently...
NOAA Coral Reef Ecosystem Division team aboard the NOAA Ship Hi'ialakai
Basic page
Safety is the number one priority of all dives at NOAA. The NOAA Diving Program has well established policies and procedures to ensure divers conduct underwater operations safely. Safe diving encompasses a process that...
NOAA Diver students and instructor on a beach in Panama City, FL
Basic page
The Standardized Equipment Program (SEP) is the centralized maintenance and distribution program for open circuit diving equipment at NOAA. The Standardized Equipment Program ensures NOAA divers are adequately equipped to...
A physician riding a stationary bicycle and breathing from compressed air as his fellow students watch
Basic page
The NOAA Diving Program (NDP), through its focus on diving safety, has a strong diving medicine component dedicated to educating and preparing divers and field medical personnel to become first responders in case of...
Diving students inside a pool using dry suits.
Basic page
The NOAA Diving Program (NDP) provides training primarily to NOAA employees that are authorized by their supervisors to dive as part of their job description. However, NDP also welcomes federal, state, and local government...

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